The Tuatha Dé Danann ("People of the Goddess Danu") were one of the mythical races who settled in Ireland before the arrival of the Milesians, the ancestors of modern Gaels. The Dananns were descendants of the goddess Danu. Her son Dagda was their most powerful leader of the Dananns.

The Tuatha Dé Dananns were a race of deities as well as race of heroes. They were skilled in art and science, poetry and magic.

They were said to come from four mythical cities: Falias, Gorias, Finias and Murias. When they came to live in Ireland, the Dananns received four magic treasures or talismans, one from each city. Before the Tuatha Dé Danann migrated to Ireland, they had learned all their skills from for four wizards/bards (druids) from these four cities. Morfesa from Falias, Esras from Gorias, Semias from Murias and Uiscias from Findias. (See the Druids of Danu)

After the Milesians defeated the Dananns, the Dananns either retreated to Tir na n-Og ("Land of Youth") or they continued to lived on the land with the Milesians, but their homes (subterranean palaces) were hidden by magic from the eyes of mortals. Their homes were commonly called Sidhe (síd or sídh) or the Otherworld. Another name for the Tuatha Dé Danann was the áes sídhe or the "People of the Sídhe".

In the Otherworld, the Danann remained young and seemingly immortal. Immortal in the sense, they can live a very long life and remain young, but they can be kill and destroy, just like any mortal.

There were frequent visits of the Dananns with the mortals. Sometimes they aided mortals, while other times they seek their destruction. Sometimes they sought marriage with mortals. Most of the times, the Dananns would come to the surface and meet their lovers, other times the mortals were allowed to live with them.

In the Ulster Cycle, the Tuatha Dé Danann was still seen as Celtic deities. However, in the Fenian Cycle, the Dananns had degenerated into nothing more then fey people; in another words, the Dananns became the "Fairy People". The Tuatha Dé Danann became frequently associated with fairies. Because of the Christian influences in the myths, some of them died in old age when they leave the Otherworld; that they were baptised before their death.

(It should be noted that the fairies in Celtic myths (especially Irish, Welsh and Arthurian myths) had nothing to do with tiny pixie with wings that are found in folklore and children fairy tales, like Tinklebell in Peter Pan or the Fairy Godmother in Cinderella. The fairies found here were human with supernatural power. Modern interpretations of fairies tend to prettify them, particularly during the Victorian period (19th century) in Britain.

In early Irish and Welsh literature, they could be tall or short, beautiful or ugly. They can be benevolent beings, but at other times they can be frighteningly cruel or malign. Morrigan and Morgan le Fay would not be considered fairies in the modern sense.)

If you are interested in the mythical history of people who settled in Ireland, read the Book of Invasions.

Please note that I have limited the number of Tuatha Dé Danann who appeared in Irish myths. I have only provided description for those who play an important role in Irish mythology, because there are just too many Dananns for my small page.

  Triple Goddesses
  Irish Gods
  Non-Danann Deities


Related pages:
     Fomoire (Fomorians)
     Firbolgs
     Book of Invasions
     Welsh Deities








Triple Goddesses

The number three was important to all Celtic tradition. Gods and goddesses were usually grouped in three or they represent three different aspects of the same deity.

Here you will find a list of triple goddesses and other goddesses found in Irish mythology.

 
Ernmas
Danu (Ana)
Morrígan
Badb, see Morrígan
Macha, see Morrígan
Nemain, see Morrígan
Eriu, Banba and Fodla
Brigit (Brigid)
 
Boann
Flidais
Aíne


Ernmas
 

In Irish myths, she was a mother goddess. Ernmas was the daughter of Etarlam, who was son of Nuada.

Ernmas was the mother of a son, named Fiachna, and three daughters who were the three sovereignity goddesses of Ireland – Banba, Fodla and Eriu. According to one version, her son impregnated her with these three daughters. Sometimes, Eirnin was said to be the mother of the three goddesses.

Ernmas was possibly the mother of the three war goddesses: Morrigan, Badb and Macha; she was also the mother of Dana (Ana). Their father was Delbáeth, son of Angus Og and Eithne.

Ernmas was killed in the First Battle of Magh Tuiredh.

 
Related Information
Name
Ernmas.

Related Articles
Banba, Fodla, Eriu, Morrigan, Badb, Macha.



Danu (Ana)
 

Mother goddess. Danu or Ana was the mother of the race of Tuatha Dé Danann. Danu was goddess of fertility and the earth. Some believed that Danu and Ana were separate entities, even both are mother goddesses.

Danu was widely worshipped mother goddess throughout Europe. She was known under various names, such as Danu, Dana and Anu in Continental Europe and Ireland. In Wales, she was called Don.

Danu married her consort Bilé (Bile), and was the mother of Dagda, who was the chief leader of the Tuatha Dé Danann. Her other offspring probably were Dian Cécht and Nuada.

With Dagda, Danu was also the mother of Ogma. Her other possible sons were Cian (Kian), Sawan and Goibhniu by Dian Cécht.

Danu was also known by another name – Brigit. Here, as Ana or Brigit, she was known as the daughter of the Dagda. She was mother of three sons; all of them were named Ecne.

In some of the sources, Danu or Ana was the proper name of the war-goddess Morrigan.

In Munster, Danu was associated with two round-topped hills, which was called Da Chich Anann or the Paps of Ana, because they resembled two breasts. Da Chich Anann literally means the "two breasts of Ana".

 
Related Information
Name
Danu, Dana (Gallic and Irish).
Ana, Anu (Irish).
Don (Welsh).

Danuvius (Roman).
Duna (hangedarian).
Donau (German).

Brigit? (Irish).

Related Articles
See also Don, Brigit and Morrigan.

Bilë, Dagda, Ogma, Dian Cécht.

Book of Invasions.

Genealogy: Children of Danu.


Morrigan or Danu
unknown



Morrígan
 

Goddess of war and fertility. Her name, Morrígan (Morrigan), means the "Queen of Demons" or the "Phantom Queen".

Morrígan was the daughter of Delbáeth and Ernmas. Morrígan was the sister of Badb, Macha, and possibly of Nemain.

Morrígan was one of the wives of Dagda. During the festival of Samhain, held on November 1, she would sleep with Dagda, to renew the future prosperity of Ireland. In this role, she was seen as the Sovereignty of Ireland.

Morrígan was also the godddess of divination and prophecy.

In Cath Mag Tuired, she was washing clothes at the ford in Unshin in Corann, near Dagda's house at Glen Edin, when Dagda encountered her on eve of Samhain festival. One foot was at Allod Echae (water in the south) and the other foot at Lisconny (north of the water). She nine loosened tresses on hair. After Dagda slept with her, she advised him of where the Fomorians were gathered and what she would do in battle. It was from Morrígan that other Celtic folklore had derived the Washer at the Ford. The Washer was sort of like a banshee, who was able to predict who would die.

In several sources, Morrígan had children, some by Dagda, and sometimes the father or fathers of her children were never named.

Morrígan had also been identified with the goddess Danu or Anu, or that Danu was Morrígan proper name, since both were named as the daughter of Delbáeth and Ernmas. And both were the mothers of Brian, Iuchar and Iurbarba, through incest with own father.

Morrígan was one of the strangest deities in Irish myths. She was tripartite goddess of war: goddess with three separate personalities or aspects. The three morrigans were Morrígan, Macha and Badb. Some say that there are three separate goddesses (morrígans) with the same name, or that her three aspects were combined into a single goddess.

In the Second Battle of Mag Tuired (Moytura), Morrígan helped the Tuatha Dé Danann, causing fear and confusion in the Fomorian ranks. With the single combat between Ogma and Indech (one of the Fomorian kings), Morrígan drained the strength from Indech.

At the end of the book, she proclaimed that the Tuatha Dé Danann won a great victory over the Fomorians.

In the tale of the Destruction of Da Derga, Morrígan caused Conaire Mor to break his last geis. Morrígan was also in love with Cú Chulainn, and appeared as a young beautiful maiden to the hero. However, Cú Chulainn rejected Morrígan's love. In the Cattle Raid of Cooley, Morrígan was one of the opponents who attacked Cú Chulainn at the ford, but each time, Cú Chulainn subdued or defeated her.

Though, she had become Cú Chulainn's enemy, in the end, she tried to save the hero. She sent a warning to Cú Chulainn, of the hero been lured away to a death trap set by his enemies, by breaking the pole of his chariot. When Cú Chulainn tied himself to a rock, dying from his wound, Morrígan in the form of raven, sat perch on his shoulder, which kept the enemies at bay. Only when his life slipped away that Morrígan flew away.


Macha

She was known as Macha, the goddess of fertility – a mother goddess. Macha appeared several times in Irish myths. In her first appearance, she was the wife of Nemed, leader of the Nemedians.

Macha also appeared as the wife of Nuada of the Silver Hand, king of Ireland and leader of the Tuatha Dé Danann. Here, Macha was the daughter of Delbáeth and Ernmas, and sister of Badb, Morrígan, and possibly of Nemain. As a tripartite goddess of war, Macha was one of the three aspects of the Morrígans. Macha died with her husband in the Second Battle of Mag Tuired (Moytura); they were killed by Balor's destructive eye.

However, Macha was most popular and active in her roles in the northern province of Ulster (Ulaid). Macha appeared twice in the Ulaid Cycle.

She was once known as Macha, the red war-goddess. Macha was the daughter of Áed Ruad. Macha married her uncle Cimbáeth and became queen of Ulaid (Ulster). It was she, who founded the city that was named after her: Emain Macha. The name Emain Macha means the "Brooch of Macha", because she marked the boundary of hill-fortress with her brooch.

In the second story of Ulster, Macha appeared again, this time as the second wife of the wealthy farmer Crunnchu. This Macha placed the curse upon the men of Ulaid, for their mistreatment of her, during her pregnancy. The curse was that during Ulster's hours of greatest need, the men of Ulster would suffer the pang like those of a woman giving birth. In this story she was the goddess of horses (See Curse of Macha).


Badb and Other Aspects

Badb was the daughter of Delbáeth and Ernmas, and sister of Macha, Morrígan, and possibly of Nemain. Badb was the wife of Neit. As a tripartite goddess of war, Badb was one of the three aspects of the Morrígans.

As Badb, Morrígan was the goddess of war, and was often referred to as Badb Catha, which means "Battle Raven". She had the ability to shift-change to a young beautiful girl or an old hag, as well a raven or crow. She was also called Banbha and Fodla.


Finally, as Nemain, Morrígan was goddess of strife and panic. Her name means "Panic". Nemain was also said to be the wife of Neit, like Badb. Nemain had been associated with the British goddess Nemetona, the goddess of the sacred grove.

Badb and Nemain appeared in Táin Bó Cuailnge on the eve of the final battle between Ulster and Connacht. They entered the camp of Connacht and her allies, where a hundred warriors died in fright. The goddesses inspired terror in the night.

Eriu was possibly another aspect of Morrigan. Again, Eriu appeared as the goddess of fertility. Eriu was the sovereignty of Ireland wedded to a mortal king. Like all her previous aspects mentioned, Eriu was also a war goddess and had the ability to change her shape from a girl to a hag, or to bird or animal. Eriu was the patron goddess of the province Meath. Ireland was probably named after her (Eire). (See Eriu.)

Morrígan was also associated with Medb or Maeve, queen of Connacht, married to a mortal king Ailill.

In later medieval period, Morrígan was associated with Morgan le Fay, a sorceress and goddess of Avalon, in the Arthurian legends.

 
Related Information
Name
Morrigan, Morrigu – "Queen of Demon".

Macha (fertility and horse).

Badb or Badba Catha (war).

Nemain, Neman (panic).

Erin, Eriu?
Medb, Maeve?

Black Annis?

Contents
Morrigan
Macha
Badb and Other Aspects.

Related Articles
See also Danu.

Ernmas, Dagda, Cú Chulainn, Medb. Áed Ruad, Macha, Cimbáeth.

Book of Invasions; Ulster Cycle.

Morgan le Fay.


Morrigan
Stone statuette



Eriu, Banha and Fodla
 

Eriu and her two sisters, Banha and Fodla, had given their name to Ireland, before the arrival of the Milesians. They were incarnation of Ireland, represented as the Sovereignty of Ireland, who wedded kings to ensure the prosperity of the isle.

Eriu and her sisters had been named as daughters of Fiachna and Ernmas, in the Lebor Gabála. Fiachna was actually Ernmas' son by a Danann named Delbáeth, who was the son of either Ogma or Angus. While in the same work, she was called the daughter of Dealbaeth (Delbáeth). This means that Eriu and her sisters were also the sisters of Morrigan, Badb and Macha.

As Eri, Eriu fell in love with Fomorian king, named Elatha, the son of Fomorian Delbáeth (son of Neit). Most Fomorians were ugly and deformed. Elatha was a beautiful son of Delbáeth and the grandson of Neit (this Delbáeth should not be confused with another Delbáeth, who was a Danann and son of Ogma or of Angus). Elatha was described as having golden curly hair. Elatha seduced her, and she became the mother of Bres. Elatha gave her a ring, so that he would later recognise his own son.

Bres became a king of Ireland, when Nuada lost his right hand, but her son's oppressive rule, the Danann had Bres expulsed. Bres took the matter to his mother. Eriu took her son to see her former lover. Elatha recognising his son, because Bres worn the ring that the Fomorian king given to Eriu. Elatha and the other Fomorian kings raised an army against the Danann.

After the Danann defeated the Fomorians in the second battle of Mag Tuired, it seemed that Lugh Lamfada married Eriu. Lugh seemed to have many wives. An unnamed wife had affair with Cermait, the son of Dagda. Out of jealousy and revenge, Lugh killed Cermait. The sons of Cermait killed Lugh, in turn. Note this contradicted that Lugh was alive to father of Cú Chulainn. (See Lugh)

Then Eriu married MacGreine, the son of Cermait. Her other sisters also married the sons of Cermait: Banba was married MacCuill, while Fodla was the wife of MacCecht. Their husband ruled Ireland after the war, until the Milesians invaded. The Milesians named Ireland – Erin, after Eriu.

In the Battle of Tailtiu, all Eriu and her sisters, along with their husbands, were killed by the Milesians. A Milesian named Suirge had killed Eriu. (See Coming of the Milesians.)

 
Related Information
Name
Eriu, Erin, Eri.

Banba, Banbha.

Fodla, Fóhla, Foda.

Related Articles
Ernmas, Bres.

Book of Invasions.



Brigit
 

Brigit (Brigid) was the goddess of healing and fertility as well as the goddess of craft, especially of metalworking. Brigit was probably the goddess of fire and poetry.

She was the warrior goddess as well as the patron goddess of craftsmen.

In the Irish myths, Brigit was daughter of Dagda. Brigit was sometimes identified with the goddess Danu, the mother goddess of the Danann, but this would cause even greater confusion in already confusing genealogy.

Birgit was normally said to be the wife of Senchán Forpeist, though in another version, she had mated Bres, one of the Danann kings, and became the mother of Rúadan.

Her son Rúadan tried to murder Goibhniu for his father, but the smith killed the youth. Her lament for son was the first keening to be heard in Ireland.

Brigit was also the mother of Brian, Iuchar and Iurbarba. Some say she was the mother of Creidhne (artificer), Luchta (carpenter) and Goibhniu (smith), the three master-craftsmen, though Goibhniu was usually called the son of Danu and Dian Cécht, and Luchta was the son of Luchad. Brigit was also said to have a grandson named Ecne.

Her name was also spelt, Brigid, means "High One" or the "One Who Is Exalted". During the time of Roman power, Brigit was identified with Brigindo or Brigandu in Gaul, while she was called Brigantia, after the Celtic tribe living in northern England.

Brigit became associated with the Christian saint, named St Brigid (d. 524-528). St Brigid was the patron saint of Ireland, and was the abbess of the nunnery of Kildare, which she had found. This saint had her spring festival on February 1, the same day of the pagan festival, called the Imbolc, also sacred to the pagan Brigit. This festival was also associated with Scottish folklore, where Brigit deposed of the blue-face winter hag, named Calleach Bheur, by turning her into stone. Calleach Bheur, however, was reborn on the Samhain-eve (October 31), bringing the winter snows with her.

 
Related Information
Name
"High One" or "Exalted One".

Brigit, Bríg, Bríg, Brigid, Brighid (Irish) Bridget, Brid, Bride (Irish saint).
Brigindo or Brigandu (Gallic); Brigantia (Briton).

Related Articles
See also Brigindo, Brigantia.

Dagda.

Book of Invasions.


Brigit
(Sorry, no information available)



Boann
 

Boann was the wife of Nechtan or Echmar, who was the god of river. Boann was also the goddess of river, particularly the river Boynne. Boann was also sometimes called Eithne.

Boann had an affair with Dagda (usually referred to as Eochaid Ollathair), during her husband's absence. Dagda had her husband on a mission. Elcmar thought the journey took only one day and one night, when actually nine months passed, because Dagda used his power to hide Boann's adultery and pregnacy from Elcmar. By Dagda, Boann became the mother of Angus Óg (and possibly of Brigit). Elcmar unknowingly became foster father of Boann's son.

According to Aislinge Óenguso (Dream of Angus), Boann was actually seen as Dagda's wife.

 
Related Information
Name
Boann, Boanna, Boinn, Bóand.

Related Articles
Dagda, Angus Óg.



Flidais
 

Goddess of the forest, hunting and wild beasts. Flidais was not only the huntress of wild animals, she was also their protector. Flidais was the mistress of stags, who had chariot pulled by deers.

Flidais was the mother of several daughters, who were druidesses or witches, such as Bé Chuille, Dianann (Dinand), and Bé Téite, and Fand; the last daughter being the wife of Manannán Mac Lir. Both Bé Chuille and Dianann aided the Tuatha Dé Danann against the Fomorians, in the Second Battle of Mag Tuired. They used their sorcery to create illusions.

Flidais was also the fertility goddess, the only one beside Queen Medb of Connacht, who could satisfy Fergus Mac Roich. Otherwise, Fergus would need seven ordinary women in his bed.

 
Related Information
Name
Flidais, Flidas, Flidhais, Fliodhais.

Related Articles
Bé Chuille, Dianann (Dinand), Fand, Manannán Mac Lir, Fergus Mac Roich, Medb.



Ainé
 

Sky goddess or sun goddess. Ainé was also seen the Irish goddess of human love and goddess of fertility of animal and agriculture.

Ainé (Aine) was the daughter of Eógabal and She was the sister of Fer Í. In some other texts, she was the daughter of Fer Í and Eógabal was her grandfather.

She appeared as the patron goddess of the province Munster, where her festival was celebrated on Midsummer Eve at Knockainy (Hill of Aine).

In the tale Cath Maige Mucrama (Battle of Mag Mucrama), her father was Eógabal, the foster son of Manannán, whom Ailill Aulomm (son of Eógan Mór) killed. Ailill then raped her, where she conceived Eógan. Eogan later became the king of Munster, and was the founder of the famous dynasty - the Eóganacht.

 
Related Information
Name
Aine, Ainé.

Related Articles
Ailill Aulomm, Eógan, Manannán.






Irish Gods

 
Bilé
Lir
Manannán Mac Lir
Nuada
Dian Cécht
Dagda
Ogma (Ogham)
Cian (Kian)
Goibhniu (Goibniu)
Credne
Luchta
Bres
 
Lugh (Lug)
Angus Óg (Oengus)
Bodb Derg
Midir
Neit


Genealogy: Children of Danu

Please note that the genealogy of the Tuatha Dé Danann is rather confusing. (Okay, downright chaotic.) I have relied on the Lebor Gabala Erren and Cath Maige Tuired, as my sources. These sources can be conflicting. The Lebor Gabála can contradict and conflict with itself in different passages, sometimes giving different parents to a Danann.

Another reason of the confusion is that the Lebor Gabála survived in several different manuscripts, and the book I used tried to put all the translations together in one volume. See Bibliography on the Lebor Gabála and Cath Maige Tuired.

The only Danann I am certain of Lugh (son of Cian and Ethlinn), and Angus, Bodb Derg and Brigit were the children of Dagda.

The point is that with the genealogy of the Tuatha Dé Danann, accuracy is not possible. So please don't take this out on me (about the three different family trees), if you are confused. I'm a little confused myself.



Bilé
 

Consort of the goddess Danu. Bilé (Bile) was the god of death. Bilé married Danu, and became the father of Dagda, the chief leader of the Tuatha Dé Danann.

Some say that he was the ancestor of Mils, the ancestors of the modern Gaelic Irish.

Bilé was the Irish equivalent of Belenus, the ancient Celtic pagan god, who was widely worshipped, in Continental Europe and in Britain. The Welsh called him Beli, the husband of Don (Danu).

 
Related Information
Name
Bile, Bilé (Irish).
Beli (Welsh).
Belenus, Bel (Gallic).

Related Articles
See also Belenus and Beli.

Danu, Dagda.



Lir
 

God of the sea. Lir was the father of Manannán (Manannan) and Lodan. Lir was known to the Welsh sea-god as Llyr.

Unlike like his son, Lir was merely a personification of the sea. Manannán appeared as more real character than he did. His role in Celtic myths was minimal.

The only tale of note about Lir is actually about his children, who were changed into swans by his third wife. This tale is titled Oidheadh Chlainne Lir or the Death of the Children of Lir.

His second wife is named Aeb, and his children are Fionuala, Aed, Conn and Fiachra. When Aeb died, Lir married his third wife Aiofe, who was actually Aeb's sister. Aiofe was jealous because she was childless and Lir loved his children.

See the Children of Lir in the new page Conversions.

 
Related Information
Name
Lir (Irish).
Llyr (Welsh).

Sources
Oidheadh Chlainne Lir (Death of the Children of Lir) from the Three Sorrows of Storytelling (16th century).

Contents
Lir
Children of Lir

Related Articles
See also Llyr.

Manannán MacLir.

Genealogy: Children of Danu.



Manannán Mac Lir
 

Sea god. Manannán (Manannan) was said to be the son of Lir, who was also a god of the sea. Manannán supplanted his father in his role as sea god. However, in the Book of Invasions, Manannán was actually the son of Allod (I haven't figure out who Allod was). Allod was a son of Elada (Elatha), so that would make him (Allod) a brother of the Dagda and Ogma.

Manannán also seemed to have control over the weather, but his powers was probably confined to the sea. Manannán was also a healer and a mighty sorcerer.

Manannán probably had a daughter named Tailtiu (Taillte), who became the foster mother of Lugh. Usually Tailtu was said to be the daughter of the King of the Great Plain and the wife of Firbolg king, Eochaidh Mac Erc. Manannán was also believed to be the father of Mongán, the reincarnation of Finn Mac Cumhaill.

Manannán married a beautiful Danann woman named Fand, who had affair with the Ulster hero, Cu Chulainn.

Manannán was also married to Aife (Aiofe), who had being transformed into a crane. Aife was killed and her skin was used to create a magic treasure bag, which would later belong to Finn and the Clan Bascna in the Fenian Cycle.

Manannán was either a lover or husband of Aine, the sun goddess of love.

Manannán lived in the "Land of Promise" or "Land of Youth". Manannán possessed the ship called "Wave-sweeper"; a vessel that can steer itself by his thought, and move without the needs of oars or winds. Manannán can also drive his chariot over water, drawn by two magical horses. Manannán sometimes wielded the "Answerer", the sword given to Lugh Lamfada.

Manannán was the patron god of the Tuatha Dé Danann. When the Dananns were defeated in battle against the Milesians, it was Manannán who led either led to the "Land of Youth" (Otherworld or Sidhe). The magic swine that Manannán owned, and kept the Tuatha Dé Danann young. Each day, the swine was killed and roasted for the Dananns to eat, and at the end of each day, the swine return to life, only to be kill and eaten the next day.

Manannán was the called Manawyddan by the Welsh. In the Welsh myths, he was the son of Llyr (Irish Lir) and the brother of the god Brân.

 
Related Information
Name
Manannan, Manandan (Irish).
Manawyddan (Welsh).

Related Articles
Lir, Danu.
Lugh, Dagda. Finn Mac Cumhaill.

Manawyddan, Brân.

Book of Invasions.


Manannan mac Lir riding Enbarr
Illustration by JJP



Dagda
 

His name means the Good God. Dagda was sometimes called Eochaid Ollathair (Father of All) and Ruad Rofhessa (Lord of Great Knowledge) Unlike the some of the other major Irish deities, Dagda was a deity confined to Ireland; no reference or evidence was found that he was worshipped on Continental Europe.

There is some confusion over his parentage. Dagda was the son of the goddess Danu and Bile. He had also being called the one of the seven sons of Ethliu.

He was the father of many of deities, among them was a son Angus Óg (Oengus or Mac Oc) by the river-goddess Boann. By his mother Danu, Dagda was the father of Ogma. Some other writers say that Ogma and Dagda were brothers; in this version they were the sons of Elatha and Eithne. Dagda was also known as the seven sons of Ethliu, which would make him the brother of Nuada, Dian Cécht, Goibhniu, Credne, Luchta and Lug Mac Cein.

Dagda was the chief leader and god of the Tuatha Dé Danann, and was the father of many children. Other sons included Bodb Derg, Aed Minbhrec (or Aed Cáem), Cermait Milbél ("honey-mouthed") and Midir. He was also the father of two daughters: Brigit and Ainge.

Dagda was described as a huge and stocky man, with superhuman strength as well as superhuman appetite. The Fomorians once held Dagda prisoner. The Fomorians threatened to kill him, if he did not eat the entire porridge in a deep pit. Dagda was said to have used an enormous wooden spoon, in which a man and a woman can sleep together in.

Dagda possessed several magical objects. One of them was the great treasure of the Tuatha Dé Danann: the magic cauldron from a magical city of Murias. The cauldron was never empty of food, and it was called Cauldron of Dagda. Dagda also had a large club or hammer so heavy that it needed wheels. This club could kill and give life. The club and cauldron bear striking resemblance to the ancient Gallic god, Sucellus.

Another object he owned was the magic harp known as Uaithne. Dagda used the harp, to change the seasons and weather. When the Fomorians stole his magic harp, Dagda along with Ogma and Lugh went to retrieve it. They found the harp in a hall of the Fomorian camp. When Dagda chanted a spell, the harp flew into his hands, killing nine Fomorians along its path.

Dagda was said to have died in the Second Battle of Mag Tuired, yet Dagda appeared during the reign of Ailill and Medb, in the Dream of Angus. Caitlin, the buck-toothed wife of Balor mortally wounded Dagda. Dagda not only lived to succeed Lugh, and ruled Ireland for 80 years before he finally succumbed to the old wound.

 
Related Information
Name
Dagda, Dagdha, Dagdae – "Good God".

Eochaid Ollathair – "Eochaid the All-Father".

In Ruad Ro-Fhessa – "Red [or Mighty] One of Great Wisdom".

Related Articles
Danu, Manannán MacLir.
Boann, Morrigan, Angus Óg, Brigit, Lugh.

Book of Invasions.



Nuada
 

King of Erin (Ireland) and leader of the Tuatha Dé Danann. Nuada had being called the son of the goddess Danu. Usually Nuada had also being called the son of Echtach and the grandson of Etarlaim. Though he had also being named as one of seven sons of Ethliu. This would make him the brother of Dagda, Dian Cécht, Goibhniu, Credne, Luchta and Lug Mac Cein.

He was either married to Macha or Nemain, or even both. These two women were both associated with Morrígan (Morrigan).

During the first battle of Moytura (Magh Tuiredh), the Dananns defeated the Firbolgs, killing Mac Erc, king of the Firbolgs. However, Nuada lost his right hand in the fighting. The people had a law that stated the mutilation of his hand prevented Nuada from ruling Ireland as their king. So the Dananns chose Bres as their king. However, Bres' rule was so harsh that the Dananns felt oppressed.

Dian Cécht (Dian Cecht) was the great physician, who had replaced Nuada's hand with magical silver hand. Nuada became known as Nuada Airgedlámh (Nuada of the Silver Hand). With a new hand, the Dananns willingly accepted Nuada as king, and had Bres stepped down from the throne. Bres however reconquered Ireland, aided by his grandfather Balor, the Fomorian leaders.

The Dananns then had to suffer from oppression from the Fomorian overlord, until the arrival of Lugh, son of Cian (Kian). Lugh sided with Nuada, and in the second battle of Moytura (Magh Tuiredh). During the battle, Balor killed Nuada. The Fomorians were defeated when Lugh killed Balor with his sling.

Nuada was said to be father of Murna of the White Neck, mother of the hero Finn MacCumhaill.

The Welsh equivalent of Nuada was either Nudd Llaw Ereint or Lludd Llaw Ereint, which is "Llud the Silver Hand".

 
Related Information
Name
Nuada, Núada, Nuadhu, Núadu (Irish).

Nuada Airgedlámh ("Nuada of the Silver Hand").

Nudd, Lludd (Welsh).
Nudd Llaw Ereint or Lludd Llaw Ereint – "Lludd Llaw Ereint".

Related Articles
See also Nudd (Lludd).

Dagda, Bres, Dian Cécht, Lugh, Balor; Finn MacCumhaill.

Book of Invasions.



Ogma
 

The Irish god of writing, eloquence and poetry. Ogma was credited of being inventor of the Celtic writing systems that the Druids used for their magic. These scripts were known as Ogham.

There are no clear indication of who Ogma's parents were. In one version, Ogma was considered to be the son of Dagda and the goddess Danu, but in others, Ogma and Dagda were brothers; in this version they were the sons of Eithne. Ogma had also being called the son of Elatha (or Elada), the king of the Fomorians.

Ogma was one the seven champions in the First Battle of Moytura (Mag Tuired), but when Bres became the king of Tuatha dé Danann, Ogma was degraded into working on humiliating manual job of gathering firewood.

When Lugh went to Nuada, asking for a place to serve the king, Ogma seemed to be Nuada's foremost fighter. During the second battle of Moytura, Ogma had killed one of the Fomorian leaders, named Indech, the son of Domnu.

Ogma had married Etain, the daughter of Dian Cécht. Ogma had a son named Caipre. Some say that he was the father of MacCuill, MacCecht and MacGrené (MacGrene), the three Danann kings who ruled Ireland, during the Milesian invasion, though other say that Neit was their father.


To the Celtic Gauls he was called Ogmios. According to both Gallic and Irish myths Ogma was a warrior god, depicted as a wrinkled old man, wearing lion's skin cloak, carrying a bow and club. The Romans considered Ogmios as the Celtic equivalent of Hercules (Greek Heracles). They also depicting Ogimos as holding people chained to his tongue by their ears, to indicate he was the god of eloquence and poetry.

 
Related Information
Name
Ogma, Oghma, Ogmae (Irish).
Ogmios, Ogmius (Gallic).

Related Articles
Danu, Dagda, Nuada.

Book of Invasions.

Ogimos



Dian Cécht
 

The Celtic god of healing. Dian Cécht (Dian Cecht) was the great physician of the Tuatha Dé Danann.

There is a lot of confusion over his parentage. Dian Cécht was said to be the son of Esarg and grandson of Neit. This makes Dian Cécht the brother of Goibhniu, Luchne and Creidne. He had also being named as the son of Dagda. In another work, Dian Cécht was the son of Echtoigh and grandson of Esoirc. While in the Lebor Gabala, he had being called one of the seven sons of Ethliu. This would make him the brother of Dagda, Nuada, Goibhniu, Luchta, Credne and Lug Mac Cein. In one poem in the Dindshenchas, Dian Cécht was even called the son of Dagda, but this was clearly a mistake, because another poem in the same work, stated differently.

Through the goddess Danu, Dian Cécht became the father of Goibhniu, Cian (Kian) and Sawan.

When Bres grew oppressive, the Dananns wanted Nuada to become their king. However, Nuada was disqualified from ruling Ireland because he lost one of his hands in battle against the Firbolgs. Dian Cécht replaced Nuada's hand with a silver hand, enabling Nuada to replace Bres as king.

Dian Cécht was not an ethical healer, because he was jealous with anyone who surpassed him as a healer, even his own children. When Miach had shown to be a greater healer than him, by restoring Nuada's original arm, Dian Cécht murdered his own son. When Airmed, his daughter, began categorying the herbs used for healing, Dian Cécht jealously mixed catalog so the results came out wrong.

In the war against the Fomorians, Dian Cécht blessed the water, which the Dananns bathed in, healing their wounds and restoring their vigour.

 
Related Information
Name
Dian Cecht, Dian Cécht, Diancecht.

Related Articles
Danu, Goibhniu, Cian, Nuada.

Book of Invasions.



Cian
 

Cian was the son of Dian Cécht and Danu. Cian had two brothers: Goibhniu (master smith), and Sawan. But according to Oidheadh Chlainne Tuireann (Death of the Children of Tuireann), his brothers were Cu and Cethe; they were the sons of Cainte.

Cian possessed a magic cow that had endless supply of milk. When Balor deceived Sawan (who was guarding the cow), Cian took revenge upon the Fomorian captain, by seducing Balor's daughter, Ethlinn. Ethlinn bore Cian three sons.

It was prophecised that Balor's grandson would one day kill him. Balor had Ethlinn (Ethnea or Eithliu) imprisoned in the tower. When her sons (triplets) were born, Balor threw each son from the tower into the sea. Only one infant was saved by Manannán (Manannan) and a Druidess named Birog. Birog brought the child to Cian. Cian put the child, whom he named Lugh, into the care of his brother Goibhniu.

Cian's death was only briefly given in the Lebor Gabala Erren, saying that he was murdered by the sons of Tuirill Biccreo - Brian, Iuchar and Iucharba. The story was greatly expanded a lot later, in the Oidheadh Chlainne Tuireann (or the "Death of the Children of Tuireann")

When Lugh manhood, he became the Deliverer of the Tuatha Dé Danann. When the Danann gathered an army to oppose the Fomorians. Cian was sent to enlist fighting men from Ulster. On his journey, he transformed himself into a pig to avoid the sons of Turenn, whom he had blood feud with. However, the sons of Turenn weren't fooled by Cian's disguised and mortally wounded the pig (Cian). Cian pleaded with the sons of Turenn that he wished to transform back to a man, they granted his boon.

When Lugh discovered his father's death, Lugh captured Turenn's sons. Lugh sent them in impossible quests (eric), if they were to escape execution. The brothers fulfilled most of the tasks. Most of the eric, Lugh sent them were obtaining items to help the Danann with the war, such as the magic spear from Persia, and the magical pig-skin that can heal any wound or disease. In their last tasks, the brothers were mortally wounded. Turenn pleaded with Lugh to heal his sons with the healing pigskin. Lugh refused. The sons of Turenn died from their wounds, thereby avenging Cian's murder.

 
Related Information
Name
Cian, Kian.
Ethlenn, Ethlend, Scal Balb.

Related Articles
Dian Cécht, Danu, Goibhniu, Birog, Lugh, Balor.

Book of Invasions.



Goibhniu
 

The master smith. Goibhniu was the smith god. Goibhniu was one of three divine craftsmen; they were known as na tri dée Dána. The other two craftsmen were Credne and Luchta. He also possessed the Mead of Youth.

Goibhniu was known as the son of Dian Cécht and Danu. Goibhniu had two brothers: Cian or Kian (father of Lugh), and Sawan. Sometimes, Goibhniu was called the son of Esarg and grandson of Neit, which make him the brother of Credné, Luchta and Dian Cécht. Goibhniu was also known as the son of Ethliu, which make him the brother of Dagda, Nuada, Dian Cécht, Credne, Luchta and Lug Mac Cein.

Goibhniu raised Lugh, teaching the boy many different skills in his crafts.

During the second battle of Moytura, Goibhniu and other craftsmen, Credné (artificer) and Luchtainel or Luchta (carpenter or wrights quickly repaired the damaged weapons for the Dananns. The three craftsmen were a triad of gods of skills called "Na tri dee dana". Some say that the other two craftsmen were his brothers.

Goibhniu killed Rúadan, the son of Bres and Bríg (Brigit), who had tried to murder the smith.


In Welsh myths, his Welsh counterpart was called Govannon, who had killed Dylan, the son of Aranrhod.

 
Related Information
Name
Goban, Goibniu, Goibhniu (Irish).
Gofannon, Govannon (Welsh).

Related Articles
Danu, Dian Cécht, Cian (Kian), Lugh.

Book of Invasions.

Govannon, Dylan, Aranrhod.



Credne
 

The master artificer. Credne was the god of gold. Credne was one of three divine craftsmen; they were known as na tri dée Dána. The other two craftsmen were Goibhniu and Luchta.

Sometimes, Credne was called the son of Esarg and grandson of Neit, which make him the brother of Goibhniu, Luchta and Dian Cécht. Credne was also known as the son of Ethliu, which make him the brother of Dagda, Nuada, Dian Cécht, Goibhniu, Luchta and Lug Mac Cein.

Since Credne was gold smith, he assisted Dian Cecht in make the silver arm for Nuada Airgetlám.

Credne assisted Goibhniu and Luchta in making new weapons and repairing damaged weapons.

Credne drowned looking for treasure in Spain (the Land of the Dead).

 
Related Information
Name
Credne, Crédne, Creidne, Credhne, Creidhne.

Related Articles
Goibhniu, Luchta, Dian Cécht.

Book of Invasions.



Luchta
 

The master carpenter. Luchta was the divine carpenter or wrights. Luchta was one of three divine craftsmen; they were known as na tri dée Dána. The other two craftsmen were Goibhniu and Credne.

Sometimes, Luchta was called the son of Esarg and grandson of Neit, which make him the brother of Goibhniu, Credné and Dian Cécht. Luchta was also known as the son of Ethliu, which make him the brother of Dagda, Nuada, Dian Cécht, Goibhniu, Credne and Lug Mac Cein.

 
Related Information
Name
Luchta, Luchtar, Luchtain, Luchtaine,Luchtine.

Related Articles
Goibhniu, Credne, Dian Cécht.

Book of Invasions.



Bres
 

God of agriculture. Bres was the son of the Danann woman, named Eriu or Eri, and of Elatha, the king of the Fomorians. Elatha was the son of Delbáeth and grandson of Neit. Bres' name was actually Eochu; that is Eochu Bres, which mean "Eochu the Beautiful".

After the war against the Firbolgs, Bres became king of Erin (Ireland), when the Danann leader Nuada lost one of his hand; Nuada could not become king because of the mutilation.

Most Danann kings were gifted with leadership, fighting, poetry, learning, or magic, but Bres lack the skill of leadership. Bres became a tyrant. So when Bres ruled became so harsh that Dian Cécht replaced Nuada's hand with one made of silver, the Dananns immediately accepted Nuada's rule, expulsing Bres from the throne.

Since Bres was half Fomorians, Balor aided Bres to regain rulership. War broke out between the Dananns and Fomorians. The Fomorians defeated the Dananns. The Dananns suffered from Fomorian oppression, until the arrival of Lugh Lamfada.

Bres was the father of Rúadan by Bríg (Brigit), the daughter of Dagda. His son died when the youth tried to murder Goibhniu.

When the Danann defeated the Fomorians, they captured Bres. Bres was spared when the former king promised to tell Lugh when it was the right time to plant and harvest the crops in the seasons.

 
Related Information
Name
Bres, Bress ("Beautiful").

Eochu Bres – "Eochu the Beautiful".

Bres MacElatha.

Related Articles
Eriu, Nuada, Dian Cécht, Lugh, Balor.

Book of Invasions.



Lugh
 

Lugh was the son of Cian (Kian), son of Danu and Dian Cécht, and Ethlinn (Ethnea or Eithliu), daughter of Balor, a Fomorian champion (leader).

Lugh was a popular sun god, worshipped throughout the Celtic world. In Gaul, he was identified as Lugus or Lug. Because Lugus was identified as the solar god, the Greeks identified Lugus with the sun god Apollo. In Wales, he was called Lleu, while in Ireland, he was called Lugh or Lug.

Lugh was considered as a later arrival of deity to Ireland, who probably originated from Gaul (France and northern Italy). Lugh probably displaced the ancient tribal god named Tograin. Lugh was associated with a Celtic autumn festival called Lugnasad, held in August 1. It was also dedicated to Tailtiu, Lugh's Firbolg foster mother.

He was popularly called Lugh Lamfada - "Lugh of the Long Arms", as well as Lugh Samildánach - "Skilled in All the Arts". Caesar and the Romans associated with Roman god Mercury (Greek Hermes).

Balor, Lugh's maternal grandfather had learned that his daughter's son would one day kill him. Balor tried to unsuccessfully confine his daughter Ethlinn, but Cian with the help of a druidess, Brióg, managed to seduce Ethlinn. Ethlinn gave birth to triplets. Balor tried to have his grandsons killed, but either Brióg or Mananán saved one of the infants (Lugh).

Mananán or his father Cian left Lugh with his foster father Goibhniu, who taught Lugh all the skills, or Tailtiu, who was formerly the wife of Firbolg king, Eochaid Mac Eirc. Tailtiu and her second (Danann) husband Eochaid Garb Mac Dúach became Lugh's foster parents. Lugh nine foster fathers who were met to protect from battle included Echdam, Eru, Fedlimid, Fosad, Ibar (Iubor), Minn, Rechtaid Finn, Scibar and Toulusdam.

Lugh have many servants serving him. His cupbearers were named Dathe, Drucht, Glan, Gle, Glesse, Taé, Talon and Trog. Below is the list of charioteer, including the names of the horses, chariots and goads:

chariots charioteers goads horses
Luachta Medol Fes Can
Anagat Medón Res Doriadha
Achad Moth Roches Romuir
Feochair Mothach Anagar Laisad
Fer Foimtinne Ilach Fer Forsaid
Golla Tenda Canna Sroba
Fosad Tres Riadha Airchedal
Cráeb Morb Búaid Ruadar
Carpat     Allriadha
      Rocedal

Lugh possessed the magic sword called Freagarthach (the "Answerer"), one of the four treasures of the Tuatha Dé Danann from the city of Findias. Lugh also possessed an invincible spear, from the city of Gorias.

As revenge for death his father, Lugh refused to heal the mortally wounds sons of Turenne with magic pigskin.

Lugh gained or borrowed Mananan's magical ship, Wave-sweeper. Lugh's dog was called Failiais.

At the end of the war, Lugh had become king of Ireland and ruled for 40 years. Cermait, the son of Dagda, had seduced Lugh's unnamed wife. Lugh killed Cermait for adultery with his wife. Cermait had three sons – MacCuill, MacCecht and MacGrené (MacGrene). They avenged their father death, by killing Lugh, at Uisnech.

Lugh was said to have four other wives: Búi and her sister Nas; Echtach and Englic.

His most famous son was Cú Chulainn (Cu Chulainn), the greatest hero in Irish myth. Lugh abducted Dectera, daughter of the Ulster's chief druid, Cathbad. When Conchobar and his warriors founded Dectera, she gave them the infant, whom they named Sétanta (Setanta).

Lugh helped his son several times, especially during the Cattle Raid of Cooley. Lugh fought in Cú Chulainn's guise for three days. Lugh allowed his son to heal and recover after the hero's encounter with Morrigan.

 
Related Information
Name
Lugh – "Light" or "Lynx".
Lugh Mac Ethnenn.

Lugh Lamfada ("Lugh of the Long Arm").
Lugh Samildánach ("Skilled in All the Arts").
Lug, Lugh (Irish).
Lugus, Lugos (Gallic).
Lleu (Welsh); Lleu Llaw Gyffes ("Lleu of the Dexterous Hand").

Related Articles
See also Lleu and Lugus.

Cian (Kian), Manannán MacLir, Dagda, Balor, Cú Chulainn.

Book of Invasions; Ulster Cycle.


Lugh
Bronze statuette



Angus Óg
 

The god of love and youth. Angus (Oengus) was the son of Dagda and Boann. He was known as Angus the Young or Mac Óc. Angus lived at Brugh na Bóinne.

Angus appeared as Mac Oc in the Book of Invasions and the Second Battle of Mag Tuired, where his wisdom saved Dagda from starving to death. See Tyranny of Bres.


The best known story about Angus was the Aislinge Oenguso (Dream of Angus). Angus fell in love with a beautiful maiden that he had seen in his dream, near a lake, surrounded by fifty companions. He became ill with his longing for this unknown girl. His parents were concern with his health, sought the identity of the girl.

Her name was Caer Iborméith (Caer Ibormeith), daughter of Ethal Anbúail, the Danann king in Connacht. Angus found out that Caer could take on the form of swan in one moment and human shape the next. Angus went to lake, to declare his love for her. He was transformed into a swan, where they flew off together. Obviously, Caer accepted his love.


In the Fenian Cycle, Angus was the foster father of the Fenian hero, Díarmait, who was the son of Don and the friend of Finn Mac Cumhaill. Twice when Diarmait and Grainne were trapped by Finn's men, twice Angus had spirited Gráinne away, while Diarmait made his escape on his own heroic skills. However, in the end, Angus couldn't save his foster son, when Diarmait was mortally wounded by a wild boar, as the prophecy or geis had predicted. Angus took body away with him, where it was preserved from decay, and would occasionally talk to Angus.

 
Related Information
Name
Angus, Oengus, Aonghus, Mac Óc, Macc Ócc.
Angus Óg, Angus Oc, Angus Mac Oc.

Related Articles
Dagda, Boann.


Angus Og
John Duncan, 1908
National Gallery of Scotland, Edimburgh



Bodb Derg
 

Bodb Derg was the god of poetry and wisdom. Bodb Derg was the son of Dagda.

Bodb Derg seemed to have ruled several different sidhes, depending on which tales you are reading. Bodb was king of the Sid ar Femen and Sid na mRen (Sileveramon.

In the story of Aislinge Oenguso (Dream of Angus), he was the king of the Sid Mumu. While in the Togail Bruidne Da Derga (Destruction of Da Derga's Hostel), his domain was in Sid ar Femuin (well at least Bodb's swineherd lived there. In the Acallam na Senórach, Bodb Derg was the king of Bruig of the Boyne (Newgrange), an Otherworld domain. Bodb lived with 150 sons of kings. Though Bruig was usually said to be his father (Dagda) or his brother Angus's domain.

In the Battle of Ventry, Bodb Derg was the king of the Danann, who aided the Fianna in the war against the invaders, led by Dáiri Donn, the King of the World.

In the Acallam na Senórach, he was described as a handsome young man with long, golden hair and brown, two-forked beard. Bodb wore sandals of silver and his feet did not disturb the dewdrops on the blades of grass. This tale also mentioned he had a son named Ferdoman.

 
Related Information
Name
Bodb Derg – "Bodb the Red".

Bodb, Bodbh, Bov.
Derg, Derga, Dearg ("Red").

Related Articles
Dagda.



Midir
 

Midir was the son of Dagda. He was often called Midir the Proud. Midir has a fairy palace in Sleive Callary.

Midir seemed to appear more frequently during the time of the Ulster and Fenian cycles than before the arrival of the Milesians.

The most important story he was involved in, when Midir appeared as the Danann husband of Etain, his second wife. His first wife's jealousy caused her to changed Etain into a butterfly. Eventually, Etain became mortal and married the mortal king, Eochy. Midir tried to win her back, but Etain finally remained with Eochy. (See the story of Etain for full story, in the Ulaid Cycle.)

In the Acallam na Senórach, Midir had three daughters, Doirenn, Aife and Aillbe. Midir married his three daughters to the three princes, the sons of Lugaid Menn (the Stammerer) – Ruide, Fiacha and Eochaid.

 
Related Information
Name
Midir, Mider.

Midir the Proud.

Related Articles
Dagda, Etain.

Wooing of Etain (Ulster Cycle).



Neit
 

God of war. Neit was a son of Dagda. Neit was said to have been the father of the Fomorians: Delbaeth, who was the father of Elatha, and of Dót, who was the father of Balor. (This Delbaeth should not be confused with the Danann son of Ogma or Angus.)

Neit may have been the consort of Morrígan. Neit was married to Badb and Frea. Neit was also said to be the father of Esarg, who was the father of the Danann physician, Dian Cécht.

Neit was the Danann king of Ireland before the arrival of the sons of Mil (Milesians). He was killed in battle against the Fomorians.

His three sons succeeded him: MacCuill, MacCecht and MacGrené (MacGrene). (According to alternative tale, they were the sons of Ogma or Cermait; both were sons of Dagda). The three sons were married to Banba, Fohla and Eriu, the three daughters of Ernmas. The three wives were the three goddesses of Ireland. The Milesians invaded Erin (Ireland) during his sons' reign.

 
Related Information
Name
Neit, Net, Nét.

Related Articles
Dagda, Ernmas, Morrígan, Ogma.

Book of Invasions.








Non-Danann Deities

 
Donn
Crom Cruach
Domnu
Eochaid


Donn
 

Donn was a chthonic Underworld god responsible for the passage of the dead. Donn was the Irish god of the dead. Donn was mainly worshipped in Munster.

Donn was probably associated with Dis Pater (Pluto or Hades), the Roman god of the dead. According to Julius Caesar, all Celtic people were descendants of Dis Pater.

 
Related Information
Name
Donn – "Dark One".

Donn (Irish).

Dis Pater (Roman).



Crom Cruach
 

Crom Cruach was the god of weather and fertility. Crom Cruach was not a Tuatha Dé Danann deity. A great gold idol was set up in Mag Sleact ("Plain of Adoration") in Ulster. Crom Cruach was a bloodthirsty god, where human sacrifices was performed. The early Irish sacrificed their first-born child, praying for fair weather and good crops.

According to the Book of Leinster, the worship of Crom Cruach was said to have been started by Tigernmas, the Milesian high king of Ireland. One Samhain night, Tigernmas and a third of the worshippers were killed themselves in the bloody rites. St Patrick was said to called upon Christ to destroy the idol.

 
Related Information
Name
Crom Cruach.

Related Articles
Tigernmas.



Domnu
 

Goddess of the Fomorians. Domnu appeared in Lebor Gabala as the mother of Indech, the Fomorian king. Her attribute is uncertain, but she may be the goddess of darkness.

 
Related Information
Name
Domnu.



Eochaid
 

A pre-Christian sun god. Eochaid was also god of lightning, which says that his sword was thunderbolt. Eochaid seemed to be either god of horses or he was a warrior on horseback.

 
Related Information
Name
Eochaid, Eochu - "horse-rider".









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