Cichol
Conand
Neit
De Domnann
Indech
Ochtriallach
Delbaeth
Elatha (Elada)
Bres, see Bres in Tuatha De Danann page
Balor
Eithne


Related pages:
     Tuatha Dé Danann




Cichol
 

A leader of the Fomorians, during the invasion of Ireland by the Partholanians.

The only source for Cichol comes from a single reference in the Lebor Gabála. At that time, the Fomorians were described as race of people, with horrible deformity. Each Fomorian warrior only has a single arm and single leg. The Partholanians defeated Cichol and the Fomorians, driving them out of Ireland.

 
Related Information
Name
Cichol, Cical.

Sources
Lebor Gabala Erren (Book of Invasions).

Related Articles
Book of Invasion.




Conand
 

A Fomorian leader and champion.

Conand had lived during the time of Nemedians arrival in Ireland.
 
Related Information
Name
Conand.

Sources


Related Articles





Neit
 

God of war. Neit was a son of Dagda. Neit was said to have been the father of the Fomorians: Delbaeth, who was the father of Elatha, and of Dót, who was the father of Balor. (This Delbaeth should not be confused with the Danann son of Ogma or Angus.)

Neit may have been the consort of Morrígan. Neit was married to Badb and Frea. Neit was also said to be the father of Esarg, who was the father of the Danann physician, Dian Cécht.

Neit was the Danann king of Ireland before the arrival of the sons of Mil (Milesians). He was killed in battle against the Fomorians.

His three sons succeeded him: MacCuill, MacCecht and MacGrené (MacGrene). (According to alternative tale, they were the sons of Ogma or Cermait; both were sons of Dagda). The three sons were married to Banba, Fohla and Eriu, the three daughters of Ernmas. The three wives were the three goddesses of Ireland. The Milesians invaded Erin (Ireland) during his sons' reign.

 
Related Information
Name
Neit, Net, Nét.

Related Articles
Dagda, Ernmas, Morrígan, Ogma.

Book of Invasions.



De Domnann
 
 
Related Information
Name
De Domnann, Dé Domnann, Dia Domnann.

Sources


Related Articles
Indech.




Indech
 
 
Related Information
Name
Indech.
Indech mac De Domnann.

Sources


Related Articles
De Domnann.




Ochtriallach
 
 
Related Information
Name
Ochtriallach, Octriallach.

Sources


Related Articles





Delbaeth
 
 
Related Information
Name
Delbaeth, Delbáeth, Delbaíth.

Sources


Related Articles





Elatha
 
 
Related Information
Name
Elatha, Elada.

Sources


Related Articles





Balor
 

Leader and champion of the Fomorians.

Balor was a son of Dot and grandson of Neit.

Balor was the Fomorian's greatest champion, and their leader. Some have referred Balor as being king of the Fomorians, but that's not quite true. In Cath Maige Tuired, it was Indech who was king of the Fomoire, while Balor himself was the king of the Hebrides, which is known as Insi Gall. The Hebrides are islands off the west coast of Scotland.

His piercing eye can destroy 200 men, burning them with poison. The only way to contain the destructive power of his gaze was to keep his eyelid close. The lid was polished, and it take at least 4 men to prop it open. So the polished lid was never open unless in battle.

According to the Cath Maige Tuired, the origin of Balor's destructive power of his eye, resulted when he was young. His father's druids were brewing magic, and the fume had affected his eyes.

In the 2nd battle of Mag Tuired, Balor killed Nuada, his wife Macha, and number of others before Lug confronted him and killed him with stone, flung from Lugh's sling, which sort of reminisced with the young Israelite David killing Goliath.

 
Related Information
Name
Balor, Balar.

Related Articles
Eithne, Cian, Lugh, Bres, Nuada, Macha.




Eithne
 

Mother of Lugh. Eithne was sometimes spelt Ethlinn or Ethniu.

Eithne was a daughter of Balor, leader of the Fomorians.

Balor know of a prophecy that if he was to have a grandson, he would die. So like the Argive king Acrisius, who locked away his daughter Danae to keep men away from her, Balor locked Eithne away in a tower in Tory Island, hoping to stop his doom from being fulfil.

Eithne had fallen in love with Cian, one of the Danann leaders. But Cian with the help of Danann druidess, Birog, managed to spirit him to visit the Fomorian princess. Eithne became pregnant with triplets. Balor learning of this, tried to have his grandsons killed, by tossing them from the tower into a whirlpool. Two of Eithne's sons died, but the youngest of the triplets, survived, and taken away by Cian and Birog. Cian named their son, Lugh, or Lug.

Confusedly, Eithne was said to be also the mother of the Dagda, Ogma and Allod (father of Manannan), by Elatha. And in another version in the Book of Invasions, she was not only the mother of Lugh and the Dagda, but also Nuada, Dian Cecht, Goihhniu, Credne and Luchta.

According to the Duanaire Finn, after the death of her father, Lugh arranged Eithne to marry Tadg, son of Nuada. Eithne became the mother of Muirenn (Muirne).

 
Related Information
Name
Eithne, Ethlinn.
Eithne Imdhearg.

Related Articles
Balor, Cian, Lugh, Dagda, Ogma, Tadg, Muirenn.









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