Alpan
Ani
Aplu
Cautha
Laran
Menrva
Nethuns
Nortia
Summamus
 
Thalna
Thesan
Tin
Turan
Turms
Uni
Voltumna
Other Deities





Alpan
 

Alpan or Alpanu was a Underworld goddess. She was also the goddess of sexual love. She was sometimes depicted wearing loose cloak and sandals, otherwise she was naked. She was also usually seen bedecked with jewellary.

 
Related Information
Name
Alpanu, Alpan (Etruscan).



Ani
 

God of passage. Ani was like the Etruscan version of the Latin god Janus, because he was similarly a two-faced god. Ani was also a sky god, dwelling in the highest heaven.

 
Related Information
Name
Ani (Etruscan).
Janus (Roman).

Related Articles
Janus.



Aplu
 

A god of light and weather. Apulu or Aplu was often identified with the Greek god, Apollo. He was usually depicted wearing a laurel leaf, and partially in cloak, otherwise he was naked. His symbols are the staff and laurel twig.

 
Related Information
Name
Aplu, Apulu (Etruscan).
Apollo (Greek & Roman).

Related Articles
Apollo.



Cautha
 

Sun god. Cautha or Catha was identified with the Roman sun god, Sol, whom the Greeks called Helius. His symbol was a sun disk crown, and depicted holding fire in each hand, rising from the sea.

 
Related Information
Name
Cautha, Catha (Etruscan).
Sol (Roman).

Related Articles
Sol.



Laran
 

God of war. Laran was usually depicted as a youth armed with helmet and a lance, and dressed in a cloak.

 
Related Information
Name
 
Related Articles
 



Menrva
 

Goddess of arts and war. The Roman goddess Minerva was probably derived from Menrva. Many of Menrva's attributes were derived from Athena, but she was also different from the Greek goddess. Where Athena was essentially a virgin goddess, Menrva was also a goddess that promote marriage and childbirth.

Menrva was a powerful and popular goddess; with Tin and the goddess Uni, they formed supreme triad of Etruscan pantheon.

 
Related Information
Name
Menrva, Menerva (Etruscan).
Minerva (Roman).
Athena, Athene (Greek).

Related Articles
Minerva, Athena, Tin, Uni.



Nethuns
 

God of fresh water. Nethuns has been identified with Neptune, who was also originally a god of wells and springs, before the Roman god inherited the attribute of the Greek sea god, Poseidon.

 
Related Information
Name
Nethuns (Etruscan).
Neptune (Roman).

Related Articles
Neptune, Poseidon.



Nortia
 

Goddess of fate. Nortia has been identified with the Greek goddess of luck, Tyche.

Nortia has a santuary at Volsini. Her symbol was a large nail. Such nail was used to hammered into a block of wood, on New Year Day.

 
Related Information
Name
Nortia (Etruscan).
Tyche (Greek).

Related Articles
Tyche.



Summamus
 

Storm god. Like the sky god Tin, Summamus wielded the thunderbolts and lightnings. He has a sanctuary at Rome.

 
Related Information
Related Articles
Tin.



Thalna
 

Goddess of childbirth. Thalna was associated with the sky god, Tin. She was always depicted as a young woman.

 
Related Information
Name
Thalna.

Related Articles
Tin.



Thesan
 

Goddess of dawn. Thesan was also the goddess of childbirth, since her name was often invoked at childbirth.

 
Related Information
Name
Thesan.



Tin
 

Sky god. Tin or Tinia was identified with both the Roman Jupiter and the Greek Zeus, where he wield the thunderbolts.

His consort was Uni, where they formed, along with the goddess Menrva, a supreme triad of the Etruscan pantheon, just like the Roman triad of Jupiter, Juno and Minerva, where they shared the temple at Capitol.

 
Related Information
Name
Tin, Tinia, Tinis, Tina (Etruscan).
Zeus (Greek).
Jupiter (Roman).

Related Articles
Uni, Menrva, Jupiter, Juno, Minerva.



Turan
 

Goddess of love. Turan was identified with Roman goddess of love, Venus. She was a tutelary goddess of Vulci.

Her sacred bird was a white swan and a dove. Her other attribute was the blossom.

 
Related Information
Name
Turan (Etruscan).
Venus (Roman).

Related Articles
Venus.



Turms
 

Like Greek god Hermes and the Roman god Mercury, Turms was the messenger of the gods and conductor of the souls of the dead to the Underworld. Like his Greek counterpart, he also wore a cloak and pair of winged sandals, as well as carry caduceus (winged herald staff).

 
Related Information
Name
Turms (Etruscan).
Mercury (Roman).

Related Articles
Hermes, Mercury.



Uni
 

Goddess of love and marriage. Uni was the consort of the sky god Tin. Uni has been identified with the Roman goddess Juno, as well as with Thalna. Uni was linked with the region of Perugia.

With Tin and Menrva, they formed the supreme triad of the Etruscan pantheon.

According to Etruscan legend, by Tin, Uni was the mother of Hercle, an Etruscan name for the hero Heracles or Hercules.

 
Related Information
Name
Uni (Etruscan).
Juno (Roman).

Related Articles
Juno, Tin, Menrva, Heracles.



Voltumna
 

God of vegetation. Voltumna was identified with the Roman god Vertumnus.

Voltumna was also a tutelary deity of the Volsinii, where the god has a temple at Bolsena, dedicated to him.

 
Related Information
Name
Voltumna (Etruscan).
Vertumnus (Roman).

Related Articles
Vertumnus.



Other Deities
 

Below, are the list of other Etruscan deities.

 
Etruscan Roman Attributes
Aita Pluto ruler of the Underworld
Atunis Adonis minor god
Charontes Charon? demon
Charun Charon Underworld gatekeeper, demon
Ethauswa Eileithyia goddess of childbirth
Februus god of purification
Fuflans Liber god of wine
Hercle Hercules demigod/hero
Horta   goddess of agriculture
Selvans Silvanus woodland god
Sethlans Vulcan god of fire
Tarchon   hero; brother of Tyrrhenus
Tiv   god of the moon
Tyrrhenus   hero; brother of Tarchon
Veive god of revenge
   









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