The Thracians were people who lived north and east of Thessaly and Macedon. The land of Thrace reached the Black Sea in the north-east, and north all the way to the Danube river. The western border is unclear. The size of Roman province of Thrace was smaller, was annexed into the Roman empire during the reign of Claudius. The Greeks did colonise part of the the Thrace, particularly on the Aegean coastlines, where they founded cities.

They were not considered to be of Greek or Hellenic origin, rather that of the Scythian origin.

In classical time, the Thracians were renown for their light infantry and their light cavalry, serving in Greek armies as mercenaries, and was especially valuable to Alexander the Great. Compared to the Greeks, Macedonians and the Romans, the Thracians were primitive, divided into tribes and living in open villages.

 
Bendis
Dionysus, see Olympians
Heros
Kotys
Zalmoxis
Zibelthiurdos





Βενδις
Bendis
 

A Thracian mother goddess. Bendis was often identified with the huntress goddess, Artemis and the moon goddess, Hecate. She is also the goddess of healing.

Bendis first appeared in Athens, during the Peloponnesian War, where she was Hellenised. An annual feast, Bendidea, was held in her honour. The geographer Strabo says that the rites and customs of the Bendidea are like those found in Thracian and Phrygian types of revelry - Bacchus (Dionysus) and Rhea (actually Cybele). The philosopher Plato also mentioned the festival in the dialogue between Adeimantus and Polemarchus of the Republic about a horse-race at night, where each rider carried a torch.

Her attributes include Thracian-style pointed hat and boots made of fox-skin, while holding up a torch in one hand.

 
Related Information
Name
Bendis, Βενδις.

Sources
Geography was written by Strabo.

Republic was written by Plato.

Related Articles
Artemis, Hecate, Rhea, Dionysus.



Ἡρος
Heros
 

A chthonic god of the underworld. Heros was frequently depicted on funerary stelae as a horseman.

 
Related Information
Name
Heros, Ἡρος.



Κοτυς
Kotys
 

A Thracian goddess. The cult of Kotys was worshipped by the Edonians, a tribe that lived around Mount Pangaeus.

The geographer Strabo described the Kotytian sacred rite having the same Thracian and Phrygian element as that of Bacchic revelry, similar to Bendideian rites. The Edonians played some instruments which sound like the roll of thunder from drums, and the frenzy shrill from stringed instrument.

 
Related Information
Name
Kotys, Cotys, Κοτυς.

Sources
Geography was written by Strabo.

Related Articles
Bendis.



Ζαλμοξις
Zalmoxis
 

Zalmoxis was a ruler and god of the underworld.

According to the Greek historian Herodotus, Zalmoxis was also called Gebeleizis, and the Thracian tribe known as the Getae. The Getae don't believed in any other god, except him.

The Getae believed that they are immortal that they don't really die; when they depart from this life, they would go to Zalmoxis. They have the strange custom of sending a messenger to Zalmoxis. The potential messenger was chosen from a number of men, each one carrying three darts. Each person was thrown on this weapon, and if he die, then he was chosen one, otherwise he was considered to be a wicked man, so the ritual was repeated, until a messenger was found.

 
Related Information
Name
Zalmoxis, Ζαλμοξις; Gebeleizis.

Sources
History was written by Herodotus.



Zibelthiurdos
 

Thracian god of storm. Like the Greek god Zeus, he was the wielder of lightnings and thunderbolts. Not much is known about Zibelthiurdos.

 
Related Information
Name
Zibelthiurdos.









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