Houses of the Northern Kingdoms




Here, is the family tree of the dynasties that the god Odin had founded, in various kingdoms. Odin had set his sons to ruled in the kingdoms of Denmark, Norway, Sweden, France, East Saxony and Westphalia. I have got all these names within the prologue of Snorri Sturluson's Prose Edda.

Snorri Sturluson (1179-1241) is our most valuable sources in Norse myths and legends. Snorri was Icelandic poet and historian, as well as politican. He wrote various works, including the Prose Edda and the Heimskringla ("History of the Norwegian Kings").

As you can see, the family tree is not completed. Most of the Norwegian kings can be found in Heimskringla, which contained both legendary and historical accounts of various rulers of Norway. And I had only named Sæming, its first king.

Also, you will find accounts about the Swedish kings, in the Ynglinga saga, beginning with Odin's son, Yngvi. The Ynglinga saga is actually the first part of Heimskringla. The difference being that Yngvi was the son of Freyr in the Ynglinga saga, not Odin's son as given in the Prose Edda.

As for Odin's son, Siggi (Sigi), as well as Siggi's descendants, you will find the full family tree in the Houses of the Volsungs and the Giukings (Niflungs). Of course, the story of this house can be found in the Volsunga Saga, poems from Poetic Edda, and in Snorri's Prose Edda.

Son of Odin Family Kingdom Important Descendants
Veggdegg
Bledegg Westphalia
Siggi Volsungs France (Hunland) Volsung, Sigmund, Helgi, Sigurd Fafnisbani
Skiold Skioldungs Denmark Skiold, Frodi, Helgi, Hrolf Kraki
Saeming Norway
Yngvi Ynglings Sweden

Snorri gave us another genealogy: groups of families that are all linked to the king known as Halfdan the Old. These families included the Niflungs (or the Giukings), the Budlings in which Atli and Bryndhild descended from, and the Ynglings.

Notes, however, in the eddaic poem (from Poetic Edda), titled Hyndluliod (Song of Hyndla), Halfdan the Old was called Ali, instead of Halfdan. Halfdan or Ali had married Alvig the Wise (Almveig in the Hyndluliod), who was daughter of Emund of Novgorod (Eymund). With the assistance of his father-in-law, he waged and won many wars in the lands of the east, including killing a king called Sigtrygg with his "icy sword-edges".

According to both Eddas, Halfdan/Ali had 18 sons. According to Snorri, the 1st nine sons of Halfdan the Old were born together and were great warriors but each one died in battle, and each one died childless. These first nine sons were listed as Thengil, Raesir, Gram, Gylfi, Hilmir, Iodur, Tiggi, Skyli or Skuli and Harri or Herra.

The other nine sons started their own dynasties.

Below are list of Halfdan's sons, their families (dynasties), and the name of their kingdoms.

Son of Halfdan Family Kingdom Important Descendants
Hildir Hildings Harald the Red-whiskered, Halfdan the Black
Nefir Niflungs (Giukings) Burgundy Giuki, Gunnar, Hogni, Gudrun
Audi Odlings Kiar
Yngvi Ynglings Sweden Eirik the Eloquent
Dag Doglings
Bragi Bragnings
Budli Budlungs Atli, Bryndhild
Lofdi Lofdungs Eylimi, Sigurd Fafnisbani
Sigar Siklings Siggeir

In the Sikling line, Siggeir was linked to the Volsungs by marriage to Signy, daughter of Volsung.

Even more important links to the Volsungs, are the Niflungs and the Budlungs. Gunnar, Hogni and Gudrun were children of Giuki. Giuki was descended of the Nefi, founder of the Niflung family. Gudrun married the hero Sigurd, her first husband. Atli and Brynild were children of Budli, hence they are known as the Budlungs. Atli was Gudrun's second husband, whom she despised, because Atli was responsible for the death of her brothers, Gunnar and Hogni.







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